Category Archives: Unmanned Systems

Google’s Project Wing Approved for Testing

Google’s Project Wing drone delivery trial has been financially backed by the United States government, which believes the unmanned aircraft systems industry could create as many as 100,000 jobs.

As part of the government UAS development project, Project Wing will become operational at one of the Federal Aviation Authority’s test sites.

The drones will be tested with external cargo loads to devise a way to fly them beyond line of sight at the Northern Plains UAS test site in North Dakota.

Tests will go from the ground surface to 29,000 feet (8840 metres) in the air, without chase aircraft, to try out the use of faster and heavier UAS at high altitudes.

Google will also develop and deploy an open-interface airspace management solution for safe low altitude drone operations which uses existing, cheap and scalable communications and information technologies, the White House said.

Project Wing was first trialled near Warwick, south-east Queensland, in partnership with Unmanned Systems Australia.

Google conducted some 30 deliveries with the 1.5 metre wide and 0.8 metre tall drones flying at 40 to 60 metres in height to sites one kilometre away. The eight kilogram drones could carry a 2kg payload in the Queensland trial.

Courtesy: UAS Vision

10TH ANNIVERSARY OF CAMCOPTER® S-100 – A DECADE OF OUTSTANDING SUCCESS

Ten years after the first delivery of CAMCOPTER® S-100 to the launch customer, the Vienna-based Schiebel company proudly celebrates the anniversary of its world class product.
Unmanned helicopter development at Schiebel started in 1995 and once the first CAMCOPTER® S-100 was supplied to the UAE Armed Forces in 2006, it took only three years before Schiebel had sold the 100th aircraft. During its ongoing production since then and in line with the company’s philosophy of permanent performance enhancement, the CAMCOPTER® S-100 UAS has undergone continuous improvement in order to meet the ever growing demand for new capabilities from its worldwide customers.

CAMCOPTER-S-100-157

Backed by Schiebel’s customers and industrial partners, the CAMCOPTER® S-100 now stands out as the unchallenged market leader in its class. After missions on five continents and oceans and in every environment from the tropics to the Arctic, the S-100 undeniably proved to be the most mature system of its kind in the world today.

The multi-sensor capability of the S-100 underpins the helicopter’s outstanding operational performance across a wide spectrum of applications, from peace-keeping and humanitarian assistance to industrial, maritime and military support. With missions completed on thirty different vessels, Schiebel takes special pride in its ability to deliver exceptional capability from remote and austere operating sites, including “single-spot” vessels. The latter clearly explains the popularity of the system among naval customers such as the French Navy, who deployed the CAMCOPTER® S-100 during their EU NAVFOR Anti Piracy Operation in the Arabian Sea, or the Italian Navy, for whose Mare Nostrum Operation in the Mediterranean the S-100 was essential.

S-100 CAMCOPTER fitted with SELES ES PicoSAR, L3 Wescam MX-10 and AIS Receiver
S-100 CAMCOPTER fitted with SELES ES PicoSAR, L3 Wescam MX-10 and AIS Receiver

Schiebel’s CAMCOPTER® S-100 has made history with several world firsts, including the first ever UAS flight displays at the Paris International Air Show, Le Bourget, the International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX), Abu Dhabi, and the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exhibition (LIMA), Malaysia. The S-100, furthermore, excelled during its security support of both the G20 Summit in Seoul, South Korea, and the Winter Olympics and Paralympics in Sochi, Russia. More recently the CAMCOPTER® S-100 was also the first UAS to be operated in the Russian and the Canadian Arctic.

In addition to such impressive achievements, Schiebel is especially proud and honored to assist the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine and the NGO Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS), whose operation has saved the lives of thousands of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea.

Besides the excellent S-100 performance, the characteristic CAMCOPTER® design has won various awards and the helicopter has made its way into the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. The system is also displayed at a most prominent location in the Vienna Technical Museum.
With this impressive pedigree Schiebel looks forward to meeting future customer needs for further increased capability and payload and to continue, supported by its partners, to deliver the most flexible, operationally effective unmanned helicopter systems in the world.

Source: Schiebel

Mozambique orders Camcopter UAVs for its patrol vessels

Mozambique will operate Schiebel Camcopter vertical takeoff and landing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from its Ocean Eagle 43 offshore patrol vessels, and has ordered three of the aircraft.

The three vessels will be delivered this month, after being ordered in September 2013 in a 200 million euro contract with French shipyard CMN that also includes three HSI 32 interceptors and 24 fishing vessels. The first Ocean Eagle was launched on 22 January 2015.

CAMCOPTER_S-100_at sea

The three Camcopter S-100 remotely piloted helicopters were ordered from Austrian company Schiebel, according to Mer et Marine, and began pre-delivery testing in Cherbourg, France.

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The trimaran Ocean Eagle 43 vessels are 43.6 metres long, are powered by four Scania engines for a top speed of 30 knots and have a range of 3 000 miles at 20 knots. They can launch a rigid-hulled inflatable boat from the stern and have a small platform able to accommodate aircraft weighing less than 200 kg.

See more – Courtesy Defence Web

SCHIEBEL CAMCOPTER® S-100 SUCCESSFULLY DEMONSTRATES ITS CAPABILITY DURING CANADIAN ICEBREAKING OPERATIONS

Vienna / Fogo Island, 18 April 2016 – At the end of March 2016 at Fogo Island in Canada, Schiebel’s CAMCOPTER® S-100 Unmanned Air System (UAS) successfully demonstrated its capabilities to a host of dignitaries from the Canadian Coast Guard, the Royal Canadian Navy, Transport Canada, the Canadian National Research Council and the University of Alaska in partnership with the Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Canadian Coast Guard CAMCOPTER_S-100_155During trials at the end of March 2016, the CAMCOPTER® S-100, equipped with the Wescam MX-10S payload camera, once again demonstrated its operational value and mission effectiveness in open waters under icy winter conditions. The combination of the VTOL air vehicle and the Wescam MX-10S camera demonstrated its potential to easily identify vessels, animals and objects at long ranges at sea.

“For the Canadian Government this trial is an important step forward to enhancing our operations by using UAV technology”, explains Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, regarding the motivations for the trials.

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The CAMCOPTER® S-100 was deployed aboard the CCGS George R. Pearkes, a light icebreaker of the Canadian Coast Guard. About 60 nautical miles north from Fogo Island, the vessel broke through the ice at speeds of up to 14 knots, guided by imagery from the CAMCOPTER® S-100, which offered to the ship’s captain not only a wide view image of the ice structure, but also identified boundaries between flat and rough ice.Canadian Coast Guard CAMCOPTER_S-100_155
Due to the S-100’s operational maturity in the maritime environment and ability to operate in a broad range of weather conditions, it is perfectly suited to support the demands of the Coast Guard. The flight tests included multiple takeoffs and landings in winter conditions. “Once again the CAMCOPTER® S-100 has demonstrated it value, flexibility and suitability for maritime operations in hostile environments”, Chris Day, Head of Capability Engineering at Schiebel, stated.
One goal of the trials was the enhancement of situational awareness by transmitting pictures directly and in real time to the ships bridge. This S-100 feature is already well proven, i.e. in the Mediterranean for humanitarian operations, and is easily adapted to support activities related to the conservation and protection of the Canadian fishing grounds.

In a press release issued by the Canadian Coast Guard at the time of the trials aboard the CCGS George R. Pearkes, the Canadian Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Hunter Tootoo was quoted as saying “I am pleased that the

Government of Canada is collaborating in this important initiative. The trial is an excellent opportunity to explore UAV technologies for the enhancement of Canadian Coast Guard services.”
Likewise Kirsty Duncan, the Canadian Minister of Science, agreed that “Science and research play a central role in our Government’s plan to build a thriving economy, and they provide the evidence the Government needs to make sound policy decisions. By conducting leading-edge trials in real environments, we are better able to understand the impacts, benefits and potential applications of this new technology and ensure that the knowledge we gain is shared with our industry and academic partners.”

CAMCOPTER® S-100 – SUCCESSFUL FLIGHTS WITH “DETECT AND AVOID” SYSTEM

CAMCOPTER® S-100 – SUCCESSFUL FLIGHTS WITH “DETECT AND AVOID” SYSTEM
Vienna / Den Helder, 09 February 2016 – Schiebel and the Netherlands Aerospace Centre (NLR), the Netherlands Coastguard and the Royal Netherlands Air Force conducted a series of  successful flights with a newly developed airborne Detect
and Avoid System at the airport of Den Helder in December 2015.

The AIRICA (ATM Innovative RPAS Integration for Coastguard Applications) project marks a major step forward in the process of safe integration of RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) into all classes of airspace.

S100 CAMCOPTER Detect and Avoid
S100 CAMCOPTER Detect and Avoid

During a special demonstration held at De Kooy Airfield in Den Helder, Schiebel provided it´s unmanned helicopter, the  CAMCOPTER® S-100, onto which the NLR developed AirScout Detect and Avoid System was installed. The Netherlands Coastguard provided a Dornier Do-228 as “intruder” and the Royal Netherlands Air Force contributed with an Alouette helicopter as “intruder”, and provided the Air Traffic Control services.

Several scenarios were successfully executed where the CAMCOPTER® S-100 “unexpectedly” encountered an intruder aircraft. The system then determined in real time the corrective action to ensure the necessary separation from the intruder aircraft.
The AIRICA project is funded through the European SESAR programme (part of the Single European Sky initiative) and the key focus – integration of an RPAS into the airspace for Netherlands Coast Guard´s applications – was effectively demonstrated
during the flights.

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Edwin van der Pol, Head of Operations Kustwacht: ”In the future we hope to use unmanned systems for our search and rescue operations. These trials are important to achieve regulations for bringing RPAS into non-segregated airspace.”

Chris Day, Head of Capability Engineering at Schiebel: “This demonstration is another positive step towards unmanned air systems gaining access to a broader range of airspace.”

Source: Schiebel Press Release.

Other sites of interest:

ARICA (ATM Innovative RPAS Integration for Coast Guard Application)

ARICA Innovation Concepts

ARICA Detect and Avoid Outcomes

LOW ALTITUDE TRAFFIC AND AIRSPACE SAFETY – LATAS

The LATAS platform provides ‘safety as a service’ to support the growing number of consumer and enterprise drones in the airspace.

LATAS is designed to work everywhere… connecting your drone over the cellular network and through satellites with one hundred percent reliability.

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Each operator has advanced situational awareness with Real-time tracking, Identification of ground and air obstacles and hazard notifications.

Visit flylatas.com

US Defense Dept wants Cargo Drones for the Pacific

Promoting the development of cargo drones will be the focus of next year’s operational energy capability improvement fund, according to a Defense Department official.

“The [fiscal year 2016] theme for OECIF is unmanned aerial vehicles,” said Steve Mapes, deputy director for expeditionary operations in the office of the assistant secretary of defense for energy plans and programs. “What we’re talking about is unmanned aerial vehicles for resupply.”OECIF provides seed money to programs that could potentially improve the energy usage of deployed forces or deliver long-term cost savings.

By using UAVs to transport cargo “you can take those trucks [that would normally have to be used to transport supplies] off the road or you can navigate or circumvent bodies of water without having to send actual forces or troops or ships” to deliver materiel, Mapes said Aug. 25 at a National Defense Industrial Association power conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.

OECIF investments in 2016 would be “targeted specially toward the Pacific,” which presents unique logistical hurdles because of its vast size, Mapes said.

“Tyranny of distance right now is hands down one of the most challenging things we have to deal with, particularly in the [U.S. Pacific Command area of responsibility],” he said. “We rely heavily on host nation agreements. We rely heavily on our joint partners to move equipment and assets from point A to point B. But one of our major defense challenges is just distance.”

As a solution, he envisioned launching supply drones off ships. “We’re talking cargo aircraft that can navigate from a ship-based platform [and] … allow us to navigate that distance without bringing that ship right up to the coast,” he said.

See more

Courtesy UASVision

MOAS drones to keep flying thanks to generous Schiebel donation

Search and rescue charity Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) will keep flying Schiebel‘s unmanned helicopters to save lives thanks to the Austrian company’s decision to offer two months of use for free.
Schiebel’s CAMCOPTER® S-100 is helping MOAS locate crammed boats of refugees in the Mediterranean Sea as part of the MOAS operation.
“Schiebel has been supportive from the very beginning, helping MOAS become the first civilian organisation to use these military-grade drones for a great humanitarian purpose. Besides giving us a subsidized rate from the start, Schiebel has now generously offered two months of free use, a donation worth more than €600,000,” said MOAS director Martin Xuereb”.
MOAS has already saved more than 8,000 men, women and children since August 2014.

Schiebel’s state-of-the-art CAMCOPTER® S-100 systems have contributed significantly to this year’s missions, assisting MOAS on practically every rescue.

 MOAS conducts professional search and rescue aboard a 40-metre vessel, M.Y. Phoenix, while MSF (Doctors Without Borders) provides post-rescue care to the migrants sheltered on board.
Thousands of migrants have drowned while crossing the world’s deadliest border but MOAS and other private and state-owned rescue operations have significantly reduced the death toll since May this year.

MOAS founder Christopher Catrambone thanked chairman Hans Georg Schiebel for his huge contribution.

Read more.